Vera KolbAstrobiology: An Evolutionary Approach

CRC Press, 2014

by Meg Rosenburg on December 11, 2014

Vera Kolb

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[Cross-posted from New Books in AstronomyAstrobiology: An Evolutionary Approach (CRC Press, 2014) is a new volume edited by Dr. Vera Kolb that brings together 37 authors from a variety of different research backgrounds to introduce this rapidly developing interdisciplinary field.  Anyone coming to the book with questions about the origin or possible manifestations of life on Earth and throughout the solar system can be satisfied that they will find answers here, many of which lead to even more intriguing questions.  As an introduction to the many facets of astrobiology, this volume succeeds in laying out the current state and main objectives of scientific research, and includes chapters touching on the philosophy of astrobiology and the role of science communication in bringing key concepts to the public.

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