Roberto TrottaThe Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All-There-Is

Basic Books, 2014

by Meg Rosenburg on October 21, 2014

Roberto Trotta

View on Amazon

[Cross-posted from New Books in PhysicsRoberto Trotta’s new book, The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All-There-Is (Basic Books, 2014) uses only the thousand (or ten-hundred) most common words in the English language to describe our current understanding and the most compelling outstanding mysteries in astrophysics and particle physics.  A senior lecturer in astrophysics at Imperial College London, and an accomplished science communicator and scientific consultant, Trotta finds creative, and often surprisingly effective, ways to introduce concepts like the Big Bang, dark matter, supersymmetry, and the multiverse.  What began as a challenge to describe his job as an astrophysicist using the Up-Goer Five text editor (inspired by the web comic, xkcd) has become a delightful exploration of the universe (the All-There-Is) that is completely free from technical jargon.  Anyone interested in cosmology—from beginners to experts—will find in this book a fresh and illuminating perspective on the present state of this dynamic field and the very human endeavor to understand it.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Don LincolnThe Large Hadron Collider: The Extraordinary Story of the Higgs Boson and Other Stuff That Will Blow Your Mind

October 9, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Physics] Don Lincoln’s new book, The Large Hadron Collider: The Extraordinary Story of the Higgs Boson and Other Stuff That Will Blow Your Mind (Johns Hopkins UP, 2014), presents an insider’s view of the largest physics experiment of our time and the discoveries that have come out of it over the past few [...]

Read the full article →

Mary-Jane RubensteinWorlds Without End: The Many Lives of the Multiverse

September 29, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Where can the the boundaries of science, philosophy, and religion be drawn? Questioning the nature of the universe is an excellent place to rethink how these categories have been deployed across time. Mary-Jane Rubenstein, professor Religious Studies at Wesleyan University, offers a genealogy of multiple-world cosmologies that demonstrates these terms pliability [...]

Read the full article →

John TreschThe Romantic Machine: Utopian Science and Technology after Napoleon

September 5, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Science, Technology, and Society] John Tresch’s beautiful new book charts a series of transformations that collectively ushered in a new cosmology in the Paris of the early-mid nineteenth century. The Romantic Machine: Utopian Science and Technology after Napoleon  (University of Chicago Press, 2012) narrates the emergence of a new image of the machine, a [...]

Read the full article →

David N. LivingstoneDealing with Darwin: Place, Politics, and Rhetoric in Religious Engagements with Evolution

August 6, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Science, Technology, and Society] David N. Livingstone’s new book traces the processes by which communities of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that shared the same Scottish Calvinist heritage engaged with Darwin and Darwinians in different local contexts. Dealing with Darwin: Place, Politics, and Rhetoric in Religious Engagements with Evolution (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014) locates [...]

Read the full article →

Thomas McFaul and Al BrunstingGod is Here to Stay: Science, Evolution, and Belief in God

June 19, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] The book discussed in this interview is God is Here to Stay: Science, Evolution, and Belief in God (Wipf and Stock, 2014) by Thomas McFaul and Al Brunsting, two authors with very different backgrounds. McFaul is a college professor specializing in philosophy and religion, Brunsting a physicist with numerous publications and patents, many [...]

Read the full article →

Peter GardenforsThe Geometry of Meaning: Semantics Based on Conceptual Spaces

June 9, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] A conceptual space sounds like a rather nebulous thing, and basing a semantics on conceptual spaces sounds similarly nebulous. In The Geometry of Meaning: Semantics Based on Conceptual Spaces (MIT Press, 2014), Peter Gärdenfors demonstrates that this need not be the case. Indeed, his research is directed towards establishing a formal, mathematically-grounded account of semantics, [...]

Read the full article →

Omar W. NasimObserving by Hand: Sketching the Nebulae in the Nineteenth Century

June 2, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Science, Technology, and Society] In Omar W. Nasim’s new book, a series of fascinating characters sketch, paint, and etch their way toward a mapping of the cosmos and the human mind. Observing by Hand: Sketching the Nebulae in the Nineteenth Century (University of Chicago Press, 2013) examines the history of observation of celestial nebulae in [...]

Read the full article →

Melinda B. FaganPhilosophy of Stem Cell Biology: Knowledge in Flesh and Blood

May 15, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Philosophy] Philosophy of science has come a very long way from its historically rooted focus on theories, explanations, and evidential relations in physics elaborated in terms of a rather mythical “theory T”. But even in philosophy of biology, attention has largely been on the concepts and abstract mathematics of evolutionary biology, not [...]

Read the full article →

Richard YeoNotebooks, English Virtuosi, and Early Modern Science

May 14, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Science, Technology, and Society] During the Great Fire of London in September 1666, Samuel Pepys went out to the garden and dug some holes. There he placed his documents, some wine, and “my parmezan cheese” for safekeeping as the buildings and streets of his city were licked and then consumed by flames. [...]

Read the full article →